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Check out our archive of Dining Guides - Yum!

Know It All
March 30, 2013, 05:00 AM

Cellophane shred is more commonly known as plastic Easter grass.

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In Germany in the 1700s, children put their caps or bonnets outside the door and found the hats filled with colored eggs on Easter morning.

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Nine out of 10 adults give their children Easter baskets.

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Jelly beans were one of the first bulk candies. In the early 1900s, jelly beans were sold by weight as penny candy.

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Jelly beans became associated with Easter because of their egg-like shape.

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The Cadbury brothers introduced the Cadbury Creme Egg in 1923. Cadbury Creme Eggs as we know them today have been on the market since 1971.

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A survey found that 75 percent of people eat chocolate bunnies ears first.

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Easter is named after Eastre, an ancient Anglo-Saxon goddess of the dawn. Her earthly symbol was the rabbit, a symbol of new life. Festivals were held in honor of the goddess in the spring.

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The most popular breeds of pet rabbits are the New Zealand White, the Angora, the Netherlands Dwarf, the Dutch and the Lop.

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Carrots are a good source of vitamin A. Vitamin A helps people, and rabbits, have good eyesight.

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In most cultures, the egg is a symbol of rebirth and fertility.

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The traditional Ukrainian art of elaborately painted eggs is called pysanka.

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In 1885, the Russian Czar Alexander III gave a special Easter gift to his wife, the Empress Marie Fedorovna. Every year thereafter, the Russian Czars commissioned a similar gift from the same young jeweler. Do you know what it was? See answer at end.

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There are some natural ways to color your Easter eggs. Boil the eggs with the skins from red onions to make red eggs. Soak hard-boiled eggs in cranberry juice for pink eggs. Rub blueberries and cranberries directly onto the egg shells for decoration.

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The color of an egg's shell depends on the breed of the hen. The color of the yolk is affected by what the hen eats.

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The United States sets quality standards for eggs. The grades of eggs are determined by the interior quality of the egg and the condition of the eggshell.

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Eggs are sorted by size. The size is determined by the weight per dozen eggs. A dozen jumbo eggs weighs a minimum of 30 ounces. Large weighs 24 ounces and medium weighs 21 ounces. The smallest size consumer eggs are Peewee at 15 ounces per dozen.

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In 1919, the National Society for Crippled Children was founded to provide medical services for children with disabilities. The organization now assists over 1 million children and adults with disabilities annually, and is known as Easter Seals.

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The 1948 movie "Easter Parade," starring Judy Garland (1922-1969) and Fred Astaire (1899-1987) was directed by Charles Walters (1911-1982). Garland's husband Vincente Minnelli (1903-1986) was originally going to direct the movie, but Garland's psychiatrist advised them not to work together.

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Answer: It was a Faberge egg. Jeweler Peter Carl Faberge made the jeweled enameled egg that opened up to reveal a surprise inside -- a diamond miniature of the royal crown. Over the years, 56 unique imperial Faberge eggs were made and, of those, 54 have been located.

Know It All is by Kerry McArdle. It runs in the weekend and Wednesday editions of the Daily Journal. Questions? Comments? Email knowitall@smdailyjournal.com or call 344-5200 ext. 114.


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