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Incumbent loses, but keeps seat
November 07, 2012, 05:00 AM By Bill Silverfarb Daily Journal staff


In an race oft described as odd, two current members of the Sequoia Healthcare District board battled to be the top vote-getter in last night’s election to fend off another current board member’s quest to dissolve the district.

Libertarian Jack Hickey was hoping to be the top vote-getter last night to prove that residents in the district are ready to dissolve it. The district collects property taxes for health-care services in southern San Mateo County.

Hickey forced the election as he still has two more years to serve in the seat he was re-elected to in 2010. The election cost the district about $160,000 and the two candidates forced to campaign to keep their seats, Kim Griffin and Katie Kane, called Hickey malicious since he has called himself a taxpayer advocate.

"It’s not looking like I will be the top vote-getter,” Hickey told the Daily Journal last night as ballots were still being counted.

Griffin earned about 37.5 percent of the vote to Kane’s 35.1 percent of the vote. Hickey finished third with about 27.4 percent of the vote.

Hickey plans to keep calling for dissolution.

"I’m going to regroup and see how worthwhile it is,” Hickey said.

He may try a petition effort before his seat expires for dissolution, he said last night.

Kane, who has served on the board since 1992, sought re-election so that the district will continue to serve the health care needs for its most vulnerable residents.

Griffin, a registered nurse, was elected to the board in 2008.

Griffin, the board’s president, hopes to see the board put more money into schools and elder care in the coming years.

With the economic downturn, Griffin previously told the Daily Journal many district residents are going without health care. With a shortage of primary care physicians in the area, residents who get insurance through the Affordable Care Act will need help accessing care, she said previously.

The district collects nearly $10 million a year and supports children’s clinics, nonprofits and nursing programs, among many other services.



Bill Silverfarb can be reached by email: silverfarb@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: (650) 344-5200 ext. 106.


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